Technological Toughness in Uncertain Times

Kootenay folk are a tough bunch. We home-cook meals, chop firewood and kindling, shovel mountains of powdery snow and drive icy swerves every winter. We troubleshoot the plumbing when we can’t find a professional to make the trek our way. Some of us hunt deer, and others hunt mushrooms. We grow gardens, scale the tallest branches of fruit trees, and preserve or freeze what we reap. We work hard at jobs in health care, tourism, business, and resource sectors. We’re no strangers to taking care of ourselves, our families, and our neighbours.

Resilience is our middle name. But how tough are we when it comes to technological resilience? One of the questions asked globally during this pandemic is: how can we make our communities more resilient, self-reliant, and adaptable?

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Shifting into Electric Gear

Steve Elder was born in New Zealand and lived there until he moved to sunny Los Angeles in the 1970s, eventually finding his way north to greater Vancouver, which he now calls home. However, summers spent vacationing at Christina Lake with his family is something that always brings back good memories for Steve. 

Perhaps that is why three years ago, Steve purchased the old Mercury shop truck that spent many years parked beside the workshop at the Christina Lake Service Station.  As a car enthusiast and career mechanic, he has big aspirations for the truck: Steve dreams that one day he might be able to electrify the 1954 pickup. It’s an ambitious undertaking, yet perhaps he is on to something much bigger.

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